Enviornmental Considerations

Concrete is an environmentally friendly building material, positively impacting our world in a multitude of conservation ways:
1. Heat: Naturally light in color, concrete helps to reduce the “heat island effect” experienced in urban areas. Pavements constructed with concrete absorb far less heat than other pavements, such as asphalt.
2. Ozone: By reflecting more light, concrete pavements reduce the urban “heat island effect”, thus helping to lower dangerous ozone levels.
3. Energy: Light-reflecting concrete pavement — in parking areas for example –greatly reduces the amount of lighting needed at night, thus saving electricity.
4. Storm water runoff: Concrete can be designed to allow storm water to penetrate through the pavement (if pervious concrete is laid) and naturally enter the ground, reducing demands on water drainage systems.
5. Earth-friendly: By being a cleaner product with no petroleum contaminants, concrete will not leach into ground water.
6. Durability: Concrete structures and pavements last longer than other materials which means they require less “energy” to repair and replace.

Take a look around you. Concrete structures and pavements stand the test of time.

Environmental Product Declaration (EPD)

With the proliferation of green measurement systems and labels, there is a growing need to understand the true impact of a product on the environment. Environmental product declarations (EPD) provide quantifiable environmental data to compare products that fulfill the same function. In order to create comparable EPD, they must follow the same rules and guidelines called product category rules (PCR).

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Concrete and The Environment

Concrete is a very environmentally friendly building material.There are several reasons why concrete impacts the world around us in a positive mannerOne of the reasons concrete is such a “green building material” is directly related to it’s “light grey” color. This light color of concrete helps to reduce the “heat island effect” experienced in our urban areas. Pavements constructed with concrete absorb far less heat than other pavements such as asphalt. By reflecting more light, concrete pavements reduce the urban “heat island effect”, thus helping to lower dangerous ozone levels. In addition, light reflecting concrete pavements (i.e. parking lots) greatly reduces the amount of lighting needed at night, thus saving electricity.

In addition to helping the environment above ground, concrete is equally friendly to the environment below ground. Concrete can be designed to allow storm water to penetrate through the pavement and naturally enter the ground. This type of pavement is referred to as “pervious pavement”. In addition to reducing the demand on storm water drainage systems, concrete does not contain petroleum substances that can leach into and contaminate our ground water. In closing, one of the main reasons concrete is an environmentally friendly building material is directly related to its durability. Structures and pavements that last longer require less “energy” to repair and replace. You don’t have to look very hard to see concrete structures and pavements that have stood the test of time